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There is a new free app called POC Ultrasound Guide [iTunes link], created by Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University.

What is it?

This app is as handy as it is streamlined to use, which is the foundation of POC – point of care. The organization makes it easy to navigate and get right to the information you need at that moment. The main applications are listed as aorta, cardiac, critical care, FAST, musculoskeletal, pelvic, and vascular.  Selecting any category will take you to another screen where transducers of choice are listed per exam. Each subsequent page afterwards takes you to a how-to of obtaining each desired image including hand positioning and location of the indicator.

 The best part is that it is FREE!

  UltrasoundApp2  UltrasoundApp1

Pros 

  • Easily could be used in the ED. 
  • Useful for junior residents who are looking to practice hand eye coordination. 
  • Images have anatomy labels which facilitates learning. 
  • Serves as a useful reminder of which windows are needed for each test such as pericardial, perihepatic, perisplenic, and pelvic windows for the FAST. 
  • Useful for senior residents and attendings to review with their juniors prior, during, or after obtaining ultrasound images to help with bedside teaching. 
  • Has pathology images for each section 
  • Clarifies confusing vocabulary such as “seagull” sign. 

Cons

  • Assumes basic knowledge of ultrasound and physics. 
  • Has limited clinical utility for senior residents or attendings with advanced ultrasound training. 
  • At times the ultrasound images are dark and the anatomy is difficult to discern. 
  • There are not any video clips which would be very helpful in any ultrasound app. 
  • No information on DVTs or optic ultrasound. 

A handy disclaimer is a part of their information page. The app is intended for individuals to use it if they are already qualified in the use of medical ultrasound or are students of medical ultrasound themselves. This app in no way replaces any formal ultrasound training.

Overall rating: 4 of 5 stars

 

I think it will be useful in the clinical area for junior residents. Anything beats carrying around a textbook, or going back to a computer workstation for teaching purposes. I would like to see images with video clips if possible. Did I mention this wonderful app is FREE!

Nikita Joshi, MD

Nikita Joshi, MD

ALiEM Associate Editor
Editorial Board Member
Academic Fellow
Stanford University, Division of Emergency Medicine
Nikita Joshi, MD